Undaunted: Normandy Review – Sharp as a Box of Bayonets

Undaunted: Normandy Review – Sharp as a Box of Bayonets


Oh, hi there, I was just grieving for some of my dead soldiers in hit new World War II game
“Undaunted: Normandy” A game that was pitched to me by my friends at the publishers as a group of guys tried to complete missions and they get shot and have names and it’s sad 🙁 How could we say no to a game like that? But I am here to tell you not to get distracted by “Undaunted” seasoning of sadness I think this is also the most entertaining World War II game to come out in 10 years Diving into the cover of my board game collection just weeks before the decade closed for business What we’ve got here is a waltz through Wharton France for any two players with an hour to spare Don’t be put off by the 20 page rulebook it’s only so long because of all these friendly headers and fat pictures In fact, you play “Undaunted” by progressing through a short campaign that starts simple but it’s still fun and then adds rules as confidently as a soldier slipping bullets into a magazine Each scenario gives you a squared slice of countryside to fight over and gives the American and German sides an objective to win the game Often some bridge or town that’s placed between the two of you like the final bun at a deadly buffet And these tokens represent the units that you’ll be bossing around the map ordering them to take objectives, to dash into cover and take shots at the enemy that will cause very real pain because I don’t wanna alarm you sergeant, but these forces are made up of people imperfect, squishy confused people Each soldier in your squad is a card that together form your very own deck and on each turn what you can do Depends on who’s here right now. Do you have to race squad ace Scouts down the left flank to claim an objective? That’s perfect because Joseph Bell is reporting for duty Do you need to lay down some machine-gun fire to pin down that enemy unit? But I hope that Henry Teller… Uh, Bob Benjamin and Paul Miller. What are you two doing here? – Ah, geez! Sorry boss.
– Yes sorry boss – We just didn’t know what to do
– Orders would be lovely
– We wonder did you need us to fire the motor again? – May we please have some orders? So, unlike most war games, “Undaunted” is not about executing some grand plan but instead about drawing cards and executing a plan for right now like bake off contestants you’ve heard of but never actually baked a Plan before and find themselves adding a pinch of ugly risks to 8 cups of Improvisation. Oh, okay. I’ll use this card to advance out of cover should I do that?
It often feel safest just to use a card to take a shot And shooting is as simple as everything else in “Undaunted” you add the protective number on the tile to the number on the token and then add the number of tiles between your token and their’s four, five, six, seven roll that number or higher and Bob is your grieving uncle: someone’s going to die Taking a hit is devastating if your opponent shoots a unit hits and you were holding that unit in your hand it is [Bang] shot out of your hand and back into the game box As if the soldier walked into your command tent:
“Sir!” – and a bullet followed them in and took them out If you’re not holding that soldier you have to search your discard or your deck for a soldier from that unit and it is again: put in the game box.
That soldier is dead forever along with possibly your hopes and dreams I say possibly because a thing in “Undaunted” is you will forget how many soldiers from each unit are in your deck so turn after turn you might sit there waiting for them to show up and they never do because that whole unit is Annihilated
It’s a lot like being ghosted except with actual ghosts involved. But don’t worry. I mean do worry a little bit – you’re incompetent and men are dying but one of the things you can do on your turn with your platoon sergeant or squad leader cards is [Cheery music] Add new boys to your deck from this sort of cruelly finite boy store room perhaps reinforcements to your existing units to get shuffled into the fray or Brand new units. Now your instinct in this deadly firefight is gonna be to call up the biggest guns immediately Carried by strapping lads who don’t give two dry toots about noise complaints But if anything seems like an obvious choice in “Undaunted”, you’ve got to look closer And in this case rule number one of deck building is always that every new card you add to your deck Makes every other card appear less frequently and in “Undaunted” your starting day isn’t junk It’s the key stone that holds this brutal church together You can’t actually move a unit into a square without sending Scout units in first to scout that space however this then gums up your deck with useless fog of war cards as if you were inserting Haribo into a stapler So in fact, let’s get some more Scouts for our deck. Also, the only unit that can control objectives are boring dull rifleman, so lets definitely bulk of our rifleman units with some of those and you do want some big guns Snipers and mortars are villainous things. So what this means is often halfway through a game of “Undaunted” you’ll have “upgraded” this clean simple little deck with all these cards: Scouts, Mortars, Machine gunmen or Riflemen and of course as you drag this army around the board You’re filling it with yet more fog of war until… until you’ve got this stumbling high variance monster where you will never be able to find the soldier who you need to issue orders to The only silver lining is of course that your opponent is helping to shrink your deck again by rem… shooting and killing the single most important cards in the whole thing, which is a bit like trying to lose weight by having somebody cut off your fingers Okay Now let’s pause the review for a second so I can talk about deck building games as a whole Since the release of the original deck-building daddy “Dominion” in 2008 this concept of players building up their own personal deck of cards during a game has spread all through tabletop and even into video games like a cold sore at a kissing convention Incidentally KissCon UK if you’re watching this please revoke my burn To name three Shut Up & Sit Down favorites deck building has been used to represent Japanese railway companies in the superb game of “Trains” Apocalyptic communities in “Arctic Scavengers” or even your characters strengthening psyche in the
“Arkham Horror Living Card Game” I have had a fantastic time with dozens of deck building games But in recent years I have started to get bored of them. Most deck building games have this simplistic additive arc where players start with a small deck of bad cards and then get to enjoy the rewarding behavior of Ooh! Adding a good card!
Ooh! Adding a better card! bulking up this thing like livestock for the slaughter. That floods our brain with dopamine, but it doesn’t always make for a very interesting game. Often, it actually feels quite shallow to me “Undaunted”? Aha! Oh my god! The deck building in this game It’s like seeing in color for the first time Instead of being drip fed rewards like a lab rat Playing “Undaunted” feels more like you’re some Doomsday Accountant set at a shifting abacus of pain, probabilities and predicting your enemy Okay, Yes, rifle squad B might have just gotten shot to ribbons off of an unlucky roll But think about it that now means every other unit in your deck is going to show up more frequently meaning they act faster. In fact when you draw cards in “Undaunted”, instead of issuing orders to that card, you can instead hunker it down voluntarily Removing it from the game And if you are cunning enough You might just end up with a deck thin and sharp enough to slip into your opponent like a cardboard shiv Also, those few high ranking cards in your deck that you can order to add more soldiers to your deck can instead be used to grab extra soldiers from your deck or your discards so that you can have a giant turn, where you issue loads of orders and this mechanic throws up a fascinating question over every game of “Undaunted”, like dirt from a grenade It asks “Should you go shopping and buy extra soldiers or should you push for that cover, that objective?” A single match of undaunted might have players,
you know, building up building up and then pushing, and then both of you might stop sit back and then build up some more and then one player might push while the other player sits back and keeps building praying their opponent runs out of steam And this vulnerability of both your plans and your deck makes “Undaunted” terrifically tense. When your opponent announces that they’re gonna shoot at a unit that’s in your hand it puts your heart in your mouth and your guts underwater
The odds are often very long, you know 1 in 10
or just 1 in 5 But players are often on the receiving end of dice rolls that threaten to blow up their whole turn [Intense music] Which is maybe a good time to mention, not a criticism exactly: I honestly don’t have any criticisms of this game. It is so entertaining, so simple, so clever and so cheap However, it is quite easy to get Daunted by “Undaunted” And what I mean by that is that this is one of those two-player games, that is particularly personal. Dice and dismay are the core of “Undaunted” but there’s a lot of dice and a lot of dismay and a lot of death You will have so many turns where you use a Machine gunner and the Scout to roll a whole bunch of dice And they all miss.
And it’s fascinating, really, the sensation of feeling your whole turn turn to dust And when your opponent returns fire with some solitary Rifleman called Alf who brains your star machine gunner from about 800 meters You can and will get grumpy. I would say for about four minutes of every hour I spent playing “Undaunted” I was the mayor of Grumpyville, a single-issue candidate running on the platform that this game was bull**** But, as I say, that is not a criticism and not just because “Undaunted” theme is as bleak and sharp as a box full of bayonets
After all, this is not a war game where you order your men to push forward It’s a war game where you order your men to kill that man in the barn. What’s his name? Steven! His name is Steven, and he needs to die now! Rather it’s not a criticism because “Undaunted” is a quick two-player game which means that one person being criminally sour will probably be a source of great joy to their opponent and usually it only lasts for a little bit of time anyway. Lasts until you get a good dice roll yourself But even if it doesn’t even if you end a game upset that’s fine because it’s so easy to just swap sides and try again or move on to the next scenario This game is, after all, very fast So that is “Undaunted” A superb and evocative strategy game tucked into the tightest of rulesets Also, i have got to give publishers Osprey Games kudos for having a scenario book that in no way teases out the games content
Like all these legacy games, we’ve been getting in recent years, where you play it and you get, like 75% of a game and the game goes
“What could be coming neeeext?” No! Instead Osprey goes
“New toys! New toys! New toys!”
So, actually, before the halfway mark in the campaign you’ve actually seen all the content and cards and mechanics that “Undaunted” has to offer and instead you just keep playing because it’s fun and not because the game has locked anything away with artificial scarcity
Don’t worry as well that they’re only being twelve scenarios because by the time I finished the campaign I would have happily swapped sides with my opponent and gone right back to the start but also the final missions are so rich and nuanced and fascinating that I would happily play any of these as standalone matches. Ah, it’s all so good There’s not a shadow of a doubt in my mind that this website will be awarding The “Shut Up & Sit Down Recommends” medal
for distinguished service to “Undaunted: Normandy” If you’re looking for board games like this one, but maybe a little more playful and light-hearted “Memoir 44” is just as easy to learn and has at this point a crates worth of expansions for you to explore Including the legendary Overlord expansion that turns “Memoir 44” into an epic eight player team game that has to be experienced to be believed On the flip side if “Undaunted” wets your World War Two whistle for shifting tactics and the whims of cruel cruel fates You might be better suited with “Combat Commander”
A game a million times more complicated than “Undaunted” but with a lot of the same DNA. The late Chad Jensen’s tactical opus has similar unpredictable card draw to simulate miscommunication, but it brings a baffling amount of depth and weirdness with a host of unique events that can trigger at any time Personally, I find combat commander to be too fiddly and simulationist for my taste but I am outnumbered and probably drastically outgunned by the number of people on the internet you think combat commander is fab I’ll just close the review by saying I could not be more excited for “Undaunted: North Africa”, which is coming out later
this year. I know it’s gonna add vehicles.
I have no idea how they’re gonna work but I cannot wait to issue direct orders to a tank to go and kill a man named Alvin But now my review is over I do have something to add, right? It is so important that we continue to tell stories about World War II that remind us this cataclysmic event was made up of human beings like you and me But I’ve got to say:
It is Maddening to me how games seem to default always to Americans versus Germans in France Americans watching this:
This might blow your mind but for every 50 soldiers who died in World War II Only one of them was an American
If we include civilians in global war dead only one in 200 was American, a number so high I couldn’t even be bothered to draw it Our storytelling within games right now has become this stuck record where we just go back to Normandy and the D-Day landings over and over and over again and this is an act of incredible unfairness Because it limits not just who gets to be a hero and who gets to be thanked for their sacrifices but how we perceive our own history? I think the storytellers and designers that work in games need to do better and then I thought Hey, If I’m gonna sit here telling people to tell different stories Why not put my money where my mouth is?
I’ll start. I’ll tell you a story I will tell you a story about the largest volunteer army, not just in World War two, but in all of human history which was the millions of Indians who signed up to fight for the Allies So just behind me, you can see Brighton’s India Gate, a gift from India to thank doctor Brighton, because Prince Albert’s palatial seafront getaway was actually used as a hospital for sick and wounded Indian soldiers in World War I.
But India’s involvement in World War II was on a completely different scale By the end of the war 2.5 million Indians had signed up to fight and British Commander say without their help
we would have lost the war You can read online about all the Victoria Crosses – Britain’s highest military honour – that were awarded to those Indian soldiers There’s Premindra Singh Bhagat who was awarded the cross for clearing 15 minefields in a marathon
96 hour stretch or Naik Fazal Din who while clearing a series of Japanese bunkers in Burma was stabbed with a samurai sword,
took the samurai sword,
killed multiple soldiers with it and still crawled home to make his report Or there is my personal favourite Rifleman Ganju Lama, who when his unit came under attack from Japanese tanks crawled up to within 30 yards of the tanks with a
PIAT gun Which looks like this and was so difficult to reload that some soldiers couldn’t do it Anyway, Lama with three injuries to his hands uses the gun to destroy both tanks WAIT takes out the tank crews as well when they try and escape and only then goes to get his hands treated for the multiple injuries that he had But one of the reasons we don’t talk very much about what India did for the Allies is that England prefers not to think about how it treated India I was actually moved to tears when I visited the pavilion by a photo of a hastily Erected funeral pyre so that some of these Indian soldiers who died Thousands of miles from their home in a war that they didn’t start could at least be cremated in the way they would have wanted But perhaps most of all we don’t like to think about India’s involvement in world war two because it is strictly incompatible with England’s role in the Bengal famine As a result of World War II there was a drastic shortage of food in Bengal and Winston Churchill Refused to stop the exporting of food from India to feed the rest of the world In fact, it’s actually worse than that:
Winston Churchill refused to allow America and Canada to send aid shipments to India saying quote “If the famine was so bad. Why was Gandhi still alive?” Gandhi, of course would survive World War two and go on to fight for Indian independence however, perhaps some 3 million Bengalis died during the famine. Many of them almost certainly as a result of British policy Incidentally, would you like to guess how many Allied soldiers died during the D-Day landings? Four and a half thousand Which coincidentally is the exact number of D-Day board games there have been Churchill was right about one thing though. He also said “History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.” Thank you very much for watching this board game review in which I talked about some people who died and it was sad! Is Shut Up and Sit Down always sad?
No. A lot of the time we tell jokes and talk about fun games that are fun I’m told it is fun. I do really like it. I’m just like I want all of that energy towards Remembrance to go just to some other people for once. Anyway, you’ve got other fun videos. Look they’re here if you haven’t subscribed Ooh baby now make my day Thank you very much everybody I’m gonna leave before Park security tell me I can’t film for commercial purposes. Bye!

100 thoughts on “Undaunted: Normandy Review – Sharp as a Box of Bayonets

  • January 21, 2020 at 10:47 pm
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    Can we get one more D Day game in?

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  • January 22, 2020 at 6:54 am
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    Just wondering, has ANYONE ELSE played Phantom League? Is it some hidden gem or forgotten trash? I have it and I have enjoyed it, but could you guys tell me if it was a Christmas gift well earned? I know it's not directly related to the video, I'm just putting up my recommendation for a future review of some sort.

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  • January 22, 2020 at 1:27 pm
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    No complaints about the history, but the 1/200 and 1/50 to me didn't really send the message I think was intended…because geography.

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  • January 22, 2020 at 4:07 pm
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    Hey just so you know, the designer based it on his grandfather, and his unit. So that's why. If you want to complain about why isn't a game based about X, why don't you design it? I

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  • January 22, 2020 at 5:11 pm
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    Loved the history lesson included in this review! Learned something new. Love Love Loved it

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  • January 22, 2020 at 5:38 pm
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    I did not know any of those stories you told at the end. I really appreciate this channel’s focus on inclusion and nuance when it comes to games and the stories it tells through its art and themes.

    Thank you!

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  • January 22, 2020 at 6:37 pm
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    There was never less than 80% of the Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front… but no, Normandy, Normandy…! 🙄

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  • January 22, 2020 at 7:03 pm
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    Loved all of this.

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  • January 22, 2020 at 11:16 pm
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    The last 5 minutes was my favorite part. Keep up the great work!

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  • January 23, 2020 at 12:27 am
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    New Zealand contributed the 3rd highest amount of pilots in the Battle of Britain and arguably the most crucial role in the entire Battle was a Kiwi: Sir Keith Park. Thanks for reminding us of all the other countries involved in the War.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 8:10 am
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    OMG, this was seriously an amazing story. But why is it always against the Germans? If there's a ww1 game I'll take Germany.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 10:17 am
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    Great reviews as always and gave us perspective on WW2.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 11:23 am
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    If I could somehow subscribe to you again I would. Amazing review.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 4:35 pm
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    Guys, I always enjoy your work, but I just wanted to say how good I thought that was. 

    I agree wholeheartedly that the obscene levels of misrepresentation – and absence of representation – in war commemoration cheapens and warps its appearances in popular culture and creates an inferior lens through which to view our history. It lessens us all. I applaud you availing yourselves of your platform and audience to give such a thoughtful and appropriate contribution towards improving that a little. A lesson to us all in how to best use what privilege we have. 

    Well done, lots of love and I look forward to your next video, you cheeky scamps!

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  • January 23, 2020 at 5:18 pm
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    Dude! This was one of the BEST reviews you've done! Thank you Quinns. Thank you.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 7:04 pm
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    Excellent review. Very informative, especially the facts about WW2 towards the end. It's important to be reminded the war games we play are based on real wars where real people were actually killed and maimed.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 9:00 pm
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    Fantastic, thanks team!

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  • January 23, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Amazing. This is actually the board game video I enjoyed the most, ever.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 9:52 pm
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    Convinced me to buy it, for sure. By the way, as a U.S. citizen, I agree that there should be so many more stories told concerning the events of WWII.
    Thanks!

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  • January 23, 2020 at 10:00 pm
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    I greatly appreciated the history lesson at the end of the video, I was curious as to why there was so much time left when you called the review done… glad I stuck around to hear the amazing information on a topic I truly have never heard anything about: Which is quite sad. Thank you.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 11:44 pm
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    Hey. Thanks for Adulting for a bit. We gotta remember this stuff.

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  • January 23, 2020 at 11:52 pm
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    My grandma told me that one of the nearest village by their home (west side of Hungary) had a "visitor" in the last few months of the war. A black fella landed there after his plane was shot down. Many people visited this village after the incident ecause these people (and their elders…) never seen a black men in their life.

    Btw thank you so much for the review! I always wanted to buy a game like this but there were too "much" and complicated or just missed something that I wanted. But now, I jsut bought the game right after the review! Thanks!

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  • January 24, 2020 at 12:46 am
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    What a video

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  • January 24, 2020 at 12:53 am
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    Thank you for your addition of history that should be more widely known.

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  • January 24, 2020 at 3:55 am
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    "You're incompetent and men are dying."
    I felt that.

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  • January 24, 2020 at 4:35 am
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    Sober and brilliant. Respect.

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  • January 24, 2020 at 7:39 am
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    Great review as usual, with surprisingly interesting history minute at the end. Keep it up!

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  • January 24, 2020 at 9:21 am
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    Art and gameplay looks good. I have one critique-point: a FUN game with a realistic WAR theme. Of course it is my personal taste, but even close 100 years after WW2, there is to much war on our planet. And war is no game nor fun. Even when there are history lessons in it. Transfer this game into any fantastic scenrio and im sold.

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  • January 24, 2020 at 3:35 pm
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    Oh Jesus. My name is Alvin.

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  • January 24, 2020 at 4:26 pm
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    the history part at the end was nice but unfortunately wrong. With a topic as complex as the bengal famine you should either dedicate more if the video to discuss why it happened or not include it at all

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  • January 24, 2020 at 5:05 pm
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    Great review- looks awesome. Unfortunately, Memoir 44 expansions have gotten very difficult to find and reprint infrequently, and randomly… (though it's still one of my favorites!)

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  • January 24, 2020 at 10:01 pm
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    Your best video! As a student of World War history I had no idea how many Indians served in the Allied forces during the conflict. Thank you for bringing awareness to their sacrifice.

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  • January 25, 2020 at 7:33 am
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    Your telling of what Winston Churchill did to the Bengali was very moving. Leave it to SU&SD to reccomend a great game and teach me something about history.

    Completely agree with your opinion on the "USA v Germany" thing. There is a reason it was called World War II.

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  • January 25, 2020 at 2:58 pm
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    Hey guys you should review Heroes of land, air and sea!

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  • January 25, 2020 at 5:20 pm
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    Thank you so much for this review! I went out and bought the game right after watching this. I have always enjoyed playing war games so this is one for my collection. Have you played Dual Powers?

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  • January 25, 2020 at 5:20 pm
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    Thanks for bringing some history to light in your review.

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  • January 26, 2020 at 9:38 am
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    Thanks for the great review.

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  • January 26, 2020 at 10:51 am
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    I don’t normally write comments, but that was a fantastic ending. Keep doing what you’re doing.

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  • January 26, 2020 at 9:01 pm
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    Wait… that music playing at 4:21 isn't that like Wii U or something??

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  • January 27, 2020 at 12:23 am
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    Someone had to say it and hearing it from an english man is all the more touching. Saludos desde España!!!

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  • January 27, 2020 at 2:13 am
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    Yet another great review !

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  • January 27, 2020 at 10:21 am
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    Quinns you plucky bastard! I watch your channel regularly as lighthearted escapism from the problems of reality. Then you go and make me cry. Not what I was looking for – but well done. Before I was just a fan. Now you are my personal Youtube hero.

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  • January 27, 2020 at 9:37 pm
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    Yes! I love the shout-out to Combat Commander. I had been thinking through the whole review that this sounds a bit like Combat Commander, but simplified. As Quinns suggests, that game is fantastic, but the complexity is not for everyone. Personally, I love that game, but I will definitely be picking up Undaunted in order to play with friends who don't appreciate the simulation-level rules in Combat Commander or friends who don't have more than about an hour to get a game in.

    Though the Normandy landings been used as a game setting so many times and their impact on the whole war is arguably over-blown, games set during the Normany invasion are unfortunately probably the easiest to sell. I'm just hoping that these first two Undaunted boxes do well and that they're able to release a wider range of scenarios in the future, using the same excellent system. Games like Combat Commander which have done well in the long run have historically been able to release add-ons which cover many different fronts during many different time periods, which not only feels fresh, but which also increases exposure to the importance of some events with which some people may be unfamiliar.

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  • January 27, 2020 at 9:55 pm
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    Bravo sir.

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  • January 28, 2020 at 8:44 am
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    Thanks SUSD, you're the reason I'm in constant debt and have no space in my house. Instantly bought this, and the added flavour of the history lesson at the end of this review was fantastic. Much love! x

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  • January 28, 2020 at 4:40 pm
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    Bayonets are not sharp

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  • January 28, 2020 at 7:47 pm
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    Can anyone remind me what the music at about 4:15 is from? I recognise it and think it’s from a video game but I can’t remember which!

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  • January 28, 2020 at 8:24 pm
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    Best bit was the history at the end… thank you! 😉

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  • January 29, 2020 at 4:23 am
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    Is your teabag still in your mug?

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  • January 30, 2020 at 9:18 am
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    That was one of my favourite reviews. Really appreciate the effort to tell stories that are not told enough.

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  • January 30, 2020 at 2:31 pm
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    Great review and history lesson. Another reason I believe we Brits tend to ignore the contributions of Indians and Africans and others is that it diminishes the national myth that it was Plucky Little Old Blighty alone against the overwhelming might of Nazi Germany, The Few versus the Hunnic Horde, the Dunkirk Spirit etc, when in fact we had the largest Empire the world had ever seen. Many of us Brits get annoyed at how some Americans will claim all the credit in winning the war and how they downplay the role of the allies, yet a lot of us do the same by ignoring the massive contributions from the Empire and Commonwealth to our war efforts as it would tarnish this national myth we've built up. I'm not trying to diminish the bravery and sacrifices of our forefathers by pointing this out, far from it, but as you say we can't forget the bravery and sacrifices of others as well.

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  • January 31, 2020 at 2:16 am
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    WOW I'm totally blown away by that bit at the end and you should start a new channel just for things like that.

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  • January 31, 2020 at 8:06 am
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    This was awesome Quinns! You shared a piece of history that I never knew and will keep with me for the rest of my life. Truly appreciate the effort you have taken to incorporate that in your review of Undaunted.

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  • January 31, 2020 at 8:15 am
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    I really appreciate you guys' normal work and your nods towards inclusion and general progressiveness. But with a very concise and deliberate addition you taught me about something my (US) education never would have bothered to. I appreciate it, and appreciate the work you and the team do. Thanks, Quins and company.

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  • January 31, 2020 at 8:59 am
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    Came for the review. Stayed for the important history. WHY is this never spoken of enough?

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  • January 31, 2020 at 11:15 am
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    Thanks for doing that piece at the end! Interesting and insightful

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  • January 31, 2020 at 3:51 pm
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    Not a fan of the WW setting in games, but you made me curious about this game. Will definitely check this one out,

    And in the topic of deckbuilders – have you played Valley of the Kings? This one has quite unique way to thin your deck. This DBC is combined with set collection mechanism so you need to get rid of your cards to score them. Premium edition was released recently, but I do prefer old one for readability and portability. Anyway – try it if you'll have a chance, rally worth it.

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  • January 31, 2020 at 6:11 pm
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    As a proud American…I **completely agree** with Quinns' point about the American-centric nature of, not just board games, but much of culture in general. The movie U-571 where a submarine crew captures the German Enigma machine was a fantastic story of bravery that needed to be told. But…why in the world did the film creators decide to depict the crew as American when they were actually Brits?!?!? W…T…F?!?!? I'm sure the marketing teams will say it's the most surefire way to make a profit (which I completely understand because I like to live in the land of reality). I'm also decidedly not one of those folks who fixates on only the faults of their own nation and Western society in general. But geez. Here's a tip: make a good movie – or board game – and people will want to see it or play it. (PS: I'm ashamed to admit I had zero idea of the contributions of courageous Indian soldiers in WW2. I'll be correcting that. Thanks for informing me, Quinns!! Anyone know any good books on the subject?)

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  • February 1, 2020 at 3:34 am
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    Osprey is a UK company and they made a call. Anyone interested in these other areas of conflict is free to publish (or kickstart) their own game and see if they can make some money.

    Normandy and the European campaigns are very interesting from a historical and gaming view. The terrain is varied, the antagonist are well recognized, and you have combined arms high tech (for the time) armies duking it out. And especially tanks. Wargamers love tanks.

    I will make no apologies for my preference of the Normandy and Arnhem campaigns over all others, and passing interest in British N. African campaigns.

    A lot of bad stuff happened during WWII. A lot of civilians died, through famine, casualties of war, internment camps, and what not. But those subjects would make perverse games. There are a lot of resources out there to learn about them besides games.

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  • February 1, 2020 at 5:33 am
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    Great Review (aus usual) but I'm blown away from the ending! Great Video and bringing the human touch and sadness of History into account. Best from germany!

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  • February 1, 2020 at 10:46 pm
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    Nintendo will sue with that soundtrack…

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  • February 2, 2020 at 12:55 am
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    Thanks for the info at the end! Appreciate you guys doing your part to influence history and the industry.

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  • February 2, 2020 at 12:55 pm
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    From Russian 2.5m dead soldiers DONT look so shocky

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  • February 2, 2020 at 12:57 pm
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    Still good review

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  • February 3, 2020 at 3:05 am
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    This is amazing, much respect! Had no idea about most of the things you taught at the end! I intend to do some more research into it myself now. Thank you for another great review and a valuable sobering lesson as well.

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  • February 3, 2020 at 2:35 pm
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    Great review!

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  • February 4, 2020 at 5:15 am
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    Kudos to Quinns for the heartfelt talk after the review.

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  • February 4, 2020 at 9:06 am
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    It's because those are the two most important armies in there. Soooo some Indians fought in a way that millions of others did? So what

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  • February 4, 2020 at 9:07 am
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    And without the Americans there wouldn't even have been a world war two, England and France would be speaking German after world war two

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  • February 5, 2020 at 12:14 am
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    Wow that part at the end, I had no idea. I'm moved to do more research on this now

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  • February 5, 2020 at 3:59 am
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    4:16 Well, guess I need to listen to Brentalfloss now. Again.

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  • February 7, 2020 at 3:15 am
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    I'll give you a story, a Japanese Admiral making damn sure that a country in South East Asia is free from Dutch rule and got court marshaled for it. Despite all of Allied propaganda saying that Japan only wants to enslave, painting the image that Japan before the WW2 surrender is evil. The Russian-Japanese War? Triple intervention by western powers. First Sino-Japanese War? Rising anti Chinese sentiment due to incident in Japan by Chinese sailors. The rise of Japanese Militarism? Read up on League of Nation's Japan's proposal on Race Equality and how multiple decisions and rejections by the west actually weaken Japan's Civilian government, yes, Japan had Civilian government before WW2, war is hell, war is cruel and yes, we need to shed the light on people often overlooked in major history. Not just those you are fighting with but also against.

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  • February 9, 2020 at 1:50 am
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    Awesome review – thanks Quinn

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  • February 9, 2020 at 3:42 am
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    Cool game. The end though!

    I have literally never heard a word about India's WW2 story before. That's pretty fucked up. I was pretty surprised by the scope of what you outlined here and needless to say this must only scratch the surface.

    Thanks for taking the time to stick that in there during a game review. A true public service.

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  • February 10, 2020 at 12:23 am
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    You need to give Axis and Allies (1940) a go. It’s my favourite WW2 game, massive large scale battles with a simple rule set and an ever changing style.

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  • February 10, 2020 at 8:34 pm
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    Thank you so very very much for sharing your knowledge of the Indian involvement, it has never been brought up in my American schooling, nor have I seen their dedication and sacrifices discussed before, so thank you for giving me such awareness on this issue. It is very sobering.
    Also as always thank you for a great, fun and clever review!

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  • February 11, 2020 at 9:30 pm
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    Well done, this is why I show up.

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  • February 12, 2020 at 2:08 am
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    @8:18 Rule mistake! "Hunkering down" a card does not remove it from the game, instead it goes back into your supply!

    Great review!

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  • February 12, 2020 at 6:05 pm
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    Wonderful ending thanks SUSD

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  • February 12, 2020 at 8:19 pm
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    WOW Glad you had the links. I had a hard time finding it going straight to Amazon. So YOU got a credit. Fine Job 🙂

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  • February 12, 2020 at 8:25 pm
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    My heart goes out to those fallen Heroes. Thank you for the reminder.

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  • February 13, 2020 at 2:15 pm
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    we stan a woke board game reviewer

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  • February 13, 2020 at 4:59 pm
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    Amazing review.

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  • February 14, 2020 at 2:23 am
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    Fantastic video! Though can't agree with your recommendation. My friend bought the game and after playing we were both left very dissapointed. The game is a glorified dice roll. Lots of gorgeous window dressing with the promise of fun deckduilding and battlefield tactics. None of that matters, you just roll dice and one of you is luckier than the other.

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  • February 14, 2020 at 3:22 pm
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    Great video and I learnt something – even though I'm a bit of a WW2 history nut I had never come across this story of the Bengal famine. Sobering. thanks for sharing.

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  • February 16, 2020 at 7:59 pm
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    Wow thanks for the history lesson! I had no idea so many Indians participated in WW2. Much respect.

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  • February 17, 2020 at 5:26 am
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    Even the simple fact that people overlook the fact that over 25 million people of the Soviet Union were killed and without them, WW2 would have been a whole different beast. The Nazi’s were more afraid of them than the Allies.

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  • February 17, 2020 at 2:23 pm
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    Why can’t there be more reviews like this? I’ve been playing board games for a long time (longer, I’m afraid, than Q has been alive), and I have know a lot of smart gamers. We tend to be history buffs. But we don’t always tend to be critical readers of history. Thanks for this.

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  • February 17, 2020 at 4:54 pm
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    Wow, unexpectetly stunning review

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  • February 19, 2020 at 1:35 am
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    Thank you for giving a voice to those who sacrificed so much. What an incredible review. (And I think I'll get the game too.)

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  • February 20, 2020 at 12:56 am
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    Thank you for the segment at the end. XXXX

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  • February 20, 2020 at 8:07 am
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    Reactions:

    "Hm, interesting. I've been looking for something like this."
    "Deckbuilder…? Eh, I'm not sure those are my thing."
    "Oh, a different kind of deckbuilder. Interesting… But… Why always Americans vs someone?"
    "Hey, to close this off…"

    I don't know how your video entered a dialogue with my mind but please stop.

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  • February 21, 2020 at 2:25 am
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    Holy shit, I really appreciate you mentioning this. You're right America, England, and Russia are always the focus when retelling the war and I had no idea India was involved to this degree. I really need to find a source that retells the war in the most complete way possible. Thank you Quinns.

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  • February 22, 2020 at 9:28 pm
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    Quinns, soberb review!!! I spent my entire saturday reviewing your videos, and I cant stop laughing!!! sincerily thank you for your company through all of this years!!!, and this review gets the best of shut up and sit down for me, not only fun and games, but conciessnes about the world that we living, Im an historian and is refreshing that smart peoople like you guys that are seeing by thousands pass info that breacks some paradigmas about history. me dont talk mucho ingles lol I hope you undestand!
    good bye and thanks for all the fish! a big hug to all the crew, the core and the news!!! all brilliant!!

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  • February 23, 2020 at 8:49 am
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    Best Quinn ever.

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  • February 24, 2020 at 4:04 pm
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    You guys continue to be the top of the bar for me when it comes to reviews, opinions, and attitude. Classy ending, and I appreciate that a lot!

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  • March 1, 2020 at 5:58 pm
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    Swedish vodka ey, very nice!

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  • March 1, 2020 at 6:05 pm
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    Indian here, thank you.

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  • March 1, 2020 at 11:23 pm
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    Great news that there is a sequel in the works. Preorder….where can one Preorder now ^^

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  • March 3, 2020 at 1:07 pm
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    I often visit the Chattri just outside of Brighton on bike rides. Its a peaceful location to remember the Indians who fought for our country but although a beautiful location it does feel like its kind of dumped out of town and forgoetten about. Well worth a visit. Remember the real narrative of WW2 is quite different from the one often posited by the media.

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