Censored Gaming Talks To The ESRB

Censored Gaming Talks To The ESRB


Hello everyone, Tom from Censored Gaming here. Back in January Censored Gaming received a
response from the ESRB regarding video game advertising and why it seems so much stricter
than other mediums. At the end of that video we asked everyone
if they had any questions they’d like answered by the ESRB. Censored Gaming picked a few of the most popular
questions and sent them off to the ESRB and now an ESRB spokesperson has been able to
get back to us with their answers. Firstly we asked who exactly sets the guidelines
and practices the ESRB enforces and if the ESRB reviews and evaluate the practices often. Also, whether there’s any way for consumers
to have a say in this process. In response we have learnt that the ESRB is
governed by industry representatives from major game publishers and console manufacturers. Its advertising guidelines originate from
and are enforced by its Advertising Review Council and that the ESRB encourages consumers
to reach out to them for any questions or concerns via their contact page and social
media accounts. They also conduct regular consumer research,
which no doubt has some influence on their guidelines. The next question asked why there is no intermediate
rating between the 13+ T rating and the 17+ M rating, since there’s a sizeable age gap
here that isn’t addressed. They explain that the purpose of the rating
system is to provide a general guideline for parents. Parents are meant to decide for themselves
what is appropriate for their children based on the information provided in content descriptors
and rating summaries. They further explain that creating more age
ratings to fill this gap does not necessarily improve the usefulness of the ratings. Next we asked about how the ESRB views drawn
or “cartoony” depictions of sex and nudity, such as that often found in Japanese titles,
and whether these are judged differently to more realistic depictions. Their answer doesn’t go into too much detail
about this but we can confirm that, yes, the art style is taken into account. To quote: “the art style (cartoon or photo-realistic)
is taken into consideration as part of the overall context, realism or intensity of the
game, but is not a deciding factor by itself”. From this answer, it interestingly seems that
anime art styles might actually be viewed less strictly than the more realistic depictions
of nudity commonly found in Western games. However, as mentioned, many other aspects
have to be taken into account too, such as the overall context. Lastly we asked why the ESRB think that the
18+ Adult Only rating should exist when an M rating is already 17 and up? Co nsole games are not allowed to release
with this rating so it essentially acts a blacklist label. The ESRB spokesperson states that it’s not
up to them to determine what games are made available to consumers. Their job is exclusively based on informing
consumers and that it’s up to retailers to decide what can and can’t be sold in
stores. It’s ultimately a decision made by the marketplace
and not the ESRB. Hopefully these answers have helped shed some
light on how the ESRB operates and its place within the game industry as a whole. Censored Gaming will continue to stay up to
date on its guidelines and practices and keep you folks updated on any changes that may
occur. I’ve been Tom from Censored Gaming. Thanks for watching.

100 thoughts on “Censored Gaming Talks To The ESRB

  • February 26, 2017 at 2:50 am
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    Why are lego game as other childrens games E 10+

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  • February 26, 2017 at 2:52 am
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    I sense bullshitery among us

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:00 am
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    So lets a starts a mailbomb to encourage change in the ESRB next time NISA or Nintendont butcher a game

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:00 am
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    You should do a video about how ratings can differ between countries, like Ratchet and Clank

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:05 am
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    So… no one is going to question the thumbnail?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:08 am
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    What background games are those

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:09 am
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    Asked my question, but they didn't answer it. They're too lazy and cheap to rework their rating system, IMO. Anyway, they didn't really answer any questions. Bunch of political spin.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:10 am
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    ESRB has 6 Ratings for Video Games:  EC (3+), E (6+), E10+, T (13+), *M (17+) *The Last Console Rating for Video Games! and The Last True Rating is **AO (18+) **Blacklisted from all Video Game Consoles!  I see that the ESRB has to Censor a Video Game that has been rated AO for PC's and Mac's!  The Video Game Consoles includes the Nintendo Switch!  Nintendo Switch is also Blacklisted from having any AO Rated Video Games!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:14 am
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    Exactly how many ec games are there anyway?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:14 am
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    Creating a rating between T and M does not improve the usefulness of the system… so do they actually think the current system is fair and useful?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:15 am
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    Does ESRB not rate PC Games from Illusion Games (i.e. Rapelay, Honey Select, Artificial Academy)?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:18 am
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    Maybe we should do a petition to let them make a 15+ rating? Maybe they can it older teen!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:24 am
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    The main difference between nudity in Western games and Japanese games is that the age of characters in anime art styles looks much younger. Look at Witcher 3 or GTA V, they're clearly adult women, while the cases of games that were censored like Dungeon Travelers 2 were of really young looking girls while they didn't have a problem with older characters.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:29 am
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    Seems like they didn't wanna take the blame on that last question lol

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:31 am
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    The fact that games can't get away with shit, but everything else can in some way, really puts me on edge… all I want to do is play my games, why can't I have that without being judged?!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:53 am
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    1:23 That alone puts the restrictions on their ratings by age in check! If they realize it's ultimately parents who will decide which games their kids can play, there's no need to encourage censorship of sexual content or violence in the game or its covers in order to "protect children who might come across this sort of content!"

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  • February 26, 2017 at 4:06 am
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    1. Yes… because publishers and manufacturers have an outstanding history of gauging their audience well and making good decisions (Shitty console hardware, nickel-and-diming micro-transactions)… I definitely want these ingrates making decisions on the products I desire.

    2. Who is part of the ARC? They ultimately dodged the question in stating who TRULY has a say in the decision.

    3. 'Regular Consumer Research'. Never once in my 18 years of gaming have I ever seen or heard of any input requested by the ESRB for how I want the ratings of my products handled. This sounds like a fancy way of saying they're using numbers provided by surveys from Publishers and Manufacturers (again), in which case, still goes through a 3rd party with considerable control on the market and has the power to filter out undesired results.

    4. The median rating of 13/17 explanation makes sense. When it comes to adults who don't care to do their own research, fewer options is better to give a general idea of the games content.

    5. In regards to the answer of real vs cartoon depictions and considerations, the answer makes sense. This is probably why, even with censorship, we still see extremely lewd depictions in highly animated arts as opposed to arts more grounded in realism. The video that was playing in the background is a good example of what you don't see in realism-based games.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 4:35 am
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    That 18/M rating question was completely deflected. Fuck them 😛 well, nice they took the time overall I guess.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 4:38 am
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    That's pretty interesting this could possibly help me with my censorship video thanks 🙂

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  • February 26, 2017 at 4:49 am
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    "Why no middle between T and M?" Too granular a guideline is no good!

    "Then why is M 17 and AO 18?" Reasons!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 4:51 am
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    im not not finna click this

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  • February 26, 2017 at 5:01 am
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    2:30
    But that's completely wrong.
    If they're made up by reps from publishers and console manufacturers, and the console manufacturers have also decided they will not allow AO games on their platforms, then yes, they have decided what can and can't be sold on consoles.
    That's some fucking snakery if I've ever seen it.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 5:24 am
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    So what the ESRB basically said is you're shit out of luck we do this for bigger badder companies and we aren't changing

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  • February 26, 2017 at 5:31 am
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    If they actually listened to consumers, they would have fixed their bullshit system already. Sick of game publishers toning down Japanese games to try and get the rating they want instead of giving us the fucking game we want.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 5:51 am
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    Okay, the major question I have after seeing this video is thus:

    If rating categories are not important enough on their own to justify creating extra categories where there exist huge age gaps, why include them at all? Why not simply include the list of content descriptors? This is especially confusing because the same set of content descriptors can result in entirely different rating categories. If the assignment of categories based on descriptors is seemingly arbitrary and there's little point in the creation of categories, would it not be better to simply cut out the category entirely and simply put the content descriptors?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 6:04 am
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    wow, esrb responsed? Great content man!!!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 6:06 am
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    So that's why the ESRB is such pricks for adult stuff, they get their pockets lined from ad companies which dictate everything.
    Same goes for youtube when ad companies DE monetize a video cause its too suggestive.
    Basically ad companies are ruining the media system as a whole.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 6:23 am
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    Guys, please, if you do contact the ESRB for feedback on censorship, do it like a respectful adult. Don't curse them out, just give honest feedback. We don't want them to start shying away from consumer feedbacks.

    This has been a public service announcement brought to you by me.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 7:03 am
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    Simply put, fuck the ESRB.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 7:17 am
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    Seriously, adults not being able to access content just because of someones idea of what kids should or should not watch based on arbitrary ages.

    How I miss the 80's and 90's. We had action figures for kids, based on movies like, Alien, Terminator and Robocop. We watched those movies as kids, and guess what? Nothing happened.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:21 am
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    WELL TBH…HONESTLY….parents almost never pay any mind to what games their children play lmfao if you told a parent their child was playing a Rated M game they'd just be like "i know i bought it for them" but if you brought up the list of what was actually IN that game…well.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:23 am
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    They're shifting the blame once again. Unless you can somehow believe that industry people are voluntarily setting these heavily restricting barriers for themselves. That'd be dumb.
    But then again, the gaming industry is no stranger to dumb.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:58 am
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    Cool, two of the three questions you guys asked were mine (the one about a potential T15 rating, and the one questioning the utility of the AO rating). Of course, the ESRB answered more or less exactly how I expected them to, which is to say they mostly deflected and answered a whole bucketful of nothing.

    I don't see how a T15 rating would be "slicing too finely", as they would put it, when we had E10 added about a decade back. Before we had "Everybody" and "Teen", but I guess the ESRB thought we desperately needed a rating to cover that important 10-12 year-old period, huh? I mean, they're too old to be "everybody", but they're not yet "teen"—what a pickle. But a jump in ratings from age 13 to 17? Pfft, big deal.

    And may I stress once again that the gap between M and AO is one whole year. Yep, don't want to make too many ratings, but we need one for 17-year-olds and one for 18-year-olds; we can't forget the mystical process known only as "the Becoming" which happens on one's eighteenth birthday—that's the day when all knowledge of the cosmos is beamed into one's brain.

    This is one of the ESRB's biggest problems as an authority: they are only interested in children in a industry whose consumer base continues to get older and older by the year. This would be fine if they weren't, once again, an authority. Their decisions affect the entire industry in North America (and, sometimes, beyond; I know for a fact decisions made in North America frequently trickle down to Europe and even the Asian territories). They don't simply inform parents, they inform game publishers—particularity "the big three" (Nintendo, Sony, and Microsoft)—and lately they haven't been doing a very good job of that.

    Considering how old gamers are on average now, the fact that AO-rated games continue to barely exist is testament to a major problem with their system. And yet, their response remains "Hey, not our problem. Blame them for misusing our system, not us."

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  • February 26, 2017 at 9:12 am
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    In present times, parents have in fact no control over what brats are buying?..

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  • February 26, 2017 at 9:52 am
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    I hope one day we can have AO games on console

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  • February 26, 2017 at 11:21 am
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    Thumbnail ?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 11:40 am
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    Basically they confirmed what we all though, it's not just the ESRB, it's just a ratings board, in the end the publisher decides what they want censored. Just turn the AO rating into PEGI's 18+ already, stop being a bunch of whining pussies, sales will go up, great for the economy, lol.

    And why isn't there a Racism and Fear warning in the US, PEGI has (Or is depicting that icon considered racism in the US)

    From The Law of Public Communication
    A game is judged by a panel of 3 raters, such as retired school principles, who have no ties to the interactive software industry.

    I'm not the youngest anymore, Aaaah my hip, I sometimes don't understand new media anymore. And here we have a bunch of people that don't understand it at all decide for everybody what can(not) be consumed.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 12:10 pm
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    if you contact them again ask them about Breath of the Wild's "exaggerated-size breasts" description.

    How do they determine what breast sizes can be used to reach specific ratings.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 12:13 pm
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    What I get is that stores don't have 18+ sections (except Japan stores)? That sucks …

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  • February 26, 2017 at 12:48 pm
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    PR bullshit. Wee need to get representative on one on one stream with someone and not let them to come up with bullshit answers from pr department.
    Most important question that needs answering without pr bs – WHO EXACTLY DO WE NEED TO CORNER FOR THIS SHIT TO CHANGE.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 1:13 pm
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    The ESRB has no place in the gaming industry as a whole.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 1:49 pm
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    1:40 What game is this?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 1:53 pm
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    TL;DR: The ESRB are full of shit and blacklist anything they don't like.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 2:02 pm
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    FUCK YOU ESRB!

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  • February 26, 2017 at 2:21 pm
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    What's the source of the video game background starting from 0:18? I need it for science, of course.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 2:23 pm
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    ESRB is far more better than what we have to deal with in Australia and the Australian Classification Board that allows almost anyone from the public to rate their games based on impact of certain content such as violence and sex nudity.

    You can have a extremist SJW on the ACB that tries to ban almost any game they deem as sexist and thus is the reason why some Anime style games were banned from Australia like Valkyrie Drive while others like Atelier Rorona, Senran Kagura and GalGun Double Peace were given R18+ ratings.

    With the ESRB only the professional people already in the know about gaming doing the rating system, while not perfect considering they have to be older than at least 30 and a professional with their conduct thus their knowledge of games can be limited to those from the 80s when they were younger, they do have a logical rating system in America that is not abused by social groups that Australia's Classification Board has unfortunately succumbed to over the years.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 2:46 pm
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    I don't understand why everyone is complaining about the ESRB. they just rate games. isn't it the publishers that decide to "censor" stuff.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:20 pm
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    No, by their answer, they do not view Anime styled games less strictly. That's because a lot of those games involve "underage characters" (as stupid as that sounds, they're not real, so whatever age they are is irrelevant), meaning that maybe they do take into consideration that they're not real, but since context is important to them, it means that most Anime games will always have issues with the ESRB.
    There have been some fringe cases though, like Gal*Gun and others (can't remember them from the top of my head) in which they got T ratings despite the characters looking underage and flat while they had "nude" scenes bordering to sex scenes.
    If the west with their culture made Anime styled games, the ESRB wouldn't have an issue, but Japanese Anime culture completely changes everything here.
    They didn't really answer these questions though…

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:33 pm
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    It's really sad that some games are censored just to avoid backlash. An artist's vision and work should be respected rather than altered.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 3:40 pm
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    While I may be missing something on the AO rating question/answer, I smell some "Soccer Mom" bullshit.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 4:08 pm
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    I wanna know the purpose of the E rating when these days, they're giving games like Pikmin 3 an E10+ rating when, in my opinion, there was nothing in that game that would warrant that rating.
    Also how Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and Wind Waker were all giving the E rating when they were first released, but giving E10+ ratings for their re-releases.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 5:17 pm
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    what game was that in the background

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  • February 26, 2017 at 6:55 pm
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    What is the game they were showing in the back ?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 6:56 pm
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    That Persona 2 Music Though

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  • February 26, 2017 at 7:34 pm
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    what sad is I had bought BMXXX on Ps2 when it came out cost me $90 after taxes. then after I had already got it found out Sony had censored it right before release, year later I get a Nintendo Gamecube find that same game at the pawn shop for it $10. and this version was uncensored, a company that usually anal about censoring stuff and alway thought of as a kid company. Yet the Ps2 had no issues with things like the Guy Game, Leisure suite Larry and Playboy's the mansion.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 7:45 pm
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    Ussually kids play videogames(this thing is not good) .Adult aren't playing(Maybe sometimes) but they have kids,WORK etc.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:23 pm
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    Adults aren't supported in this industry, we need to make an issue out of this. This includes having an open market for M rated titles.

    I'm 40 and I sure as hell don't need censorship in any of my content.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:25 pm
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    thumbnail?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:27 pm
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    what games were shown in this video ?

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  • February 26, 2017 at 8:54 pm
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    I like wizards

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  • February 26, 2017 at 9:59 pm
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    Thanks

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  • February 26, 2017 at 10:26 pm
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    They're response is that "PARENTS" so parenting comes to play with the rating yet dad or mom still buys GTA for their kids also dodging the question on the last part were it's the market, they're just passing the responsibility wtf

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  • February 26, 2017 at 10:50 pm
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    I'm really smart to decide what is best if I had a kid. Stop giving us BS.

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  • February 26, 2017 at 11:43 pm
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    Like I said before in the one of previous vids, what's the point of keeping the ESRB around if it's just a shell of its former self? Hell, we could instead just have the MPAA do the whole rating system for games along movies as well and it wouldn't make a single spit of difference at all…

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  • February 27, 2017 at 12:11 am
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    Now try to contact CERO.

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  • February 27, 2017 at 2:44 am
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    Didn't ask a question how do their toughs about that some parent ignore the ESRB rating when they buys games for their children and get offended by it's content further down the road.

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  • February 27, 2017 at 5:21 am
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    The rating system is nearly useless. The best way for parents to decide on the content is just go on YouTube and watch a few gameplay/lets play videos. With that you find out what's actually in the game .

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  • February 27, 2017 at 10:02 am
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    Do people really follow the ESRB guidelines?

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  • February 27, 2017 at 10:03 am
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    Yeah, I prefer the age ratings we have here in Europe: 3,7,12,16 and 18. The system doesn't have too large gaps between the ratings. It's rather weird how most kids centered games are rated E10 in the US, like Skylanders for example , when they're clearly aimed at 7-year olds and up.

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  • February 27, 2017 at 5:25 pm
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    what game is pictured in the thumbnail?

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  • February 28, 2017 at 1:02 am
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    The ESRB is miles better than CERO, but it will only be good when they get rid of the fucking AO rating that acts as censorship basically.

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  • March 1, 2017 at 7:26 am
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    Western and gritty nudity is less restrictive than Eastern clean cell-shaded art? What the fuck?
    I also love how they didn't at all answer why they have the AO rating.

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  • March 2, 2017 at 4:37 am
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    Why can't we just download a patch with an ID card that can be checked for our "age" so we can play whatever game we want uncensored? Plenty of Adult gamers (I'm 30, BTW) are sick of censorship and now we have the kind technology in place that should get around that, so maybe we should use it.

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  • March 2, 2017 at 7:17 am
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    No, it is absolutely not a decision made by the marketplace or retailers. It is a decision made by Microsoft, Nintendo, and Sony. The buck stops there. They are the ones who openly and freely declared that they will never license either an AO rated title or an unrated title to ever boot on their systems. It is a flat out lie to claim that the marketplace has any say whatsoever in this matter. And while they very much like to paint the AO rating as a porn-only rating, that is certainly not the case. The reason Manhunt 2 was given an AO rating originally, for instance, was because the story subject matter and environment actually made killing seem like a horrible thing and not just a laughable fun jaunt like it is in most games. Because of its dark, brooding atmosphere, they banned it.

    And it IS a ban. Due to the legal system in the United States, that declaration by console makers that they will not license AO rated or unrated titles to boot on their system de facto makes it a violation of federal law to create such a game which can run on those systems. The DMCA guarantees that. This guarantees that the ESRB receives their $10,000 – $30,000 per title to look at the game and 'rate' the content.

    What you should have asked them is why a ratings system is not needed for books and why simply having a 'childrens' section in bookstores is beyond adequate for informing parents, yet videogames require this absurdly expensive, restrictive process that results in games featuring animated characters (which is all games, not a one is 'realistic' and it would be best if people stopped using that word to ever refer to animated characters) being the most aggressively censored medium in existence. Or ask them why they consistently refer to the content of games by conflating reality with fiction. Instead of saying a game features fictional characters which engage in simulated content, they say a game features people killing each other. That is intellectually dishonest. Killing of people is deemed morally wrong for specific reasons, and not a single one of those reasons is present when fictional characters engage in simulated combat. Paying attention to the "death" and ignoring the constant rebirth is both selective and malicious censormongering.

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  • March 3, 2017 at 6:24 am
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    money talks, nuff said

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  • March 5, 2017 at 6:38 pm
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    for fuck's sake, we want a middle ground rating because developers who yearn for a teen rating will have to censor some things to avoid advertsement and Sales restrictions that comes with the Mature rating, it's not about fucking parents judging shit it's about making something more accurate and less problematic.

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  • March 6, 2017 at 6:12 pm
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    ESRB needs to die. It servers literally no purpose except destroy the gaming market. I would never use their system when buying games for anyone. It is as useful as asking your grandmother if you should buy the game. She'll have her opinion, but it won't be anywhere near the opinion of a buyer.

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  • March 6, 2017 at 6:27 pm
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    what is the game in the background?

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  • March 8, 2017 at 3:41 am
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    Thank you so much for sharing this piece of information.

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  • March 10, 2017 at 10:10 pm
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    Political non-answer bullshit…

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  • March 14, 2017 at 6:15 am
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    Gave me slightly more respect for the ESRB, as I wouldn't expect them to even take the time to talk about this. I would very much like to track everything to their roots as far as what is and is not allowed in the west goes. So I should look for info from retailers next I suppose. Maybe you should make a video on them.

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  • March 17, 2017 at 3:53 pm
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    The art style can change the age rating. Dragon Ball: Origins got a Teen rating by ESRB, and Goku's penis was completely uncensored and appeared multiple times in the game.

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  • March 26, 2017 at 1:50 pm
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    That's why I'm studying japanese. I'm tired of this western bullshit.

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  • April 11, 2017 at 1:06 am
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    Well I think one thing about the nudity in Japanese games is that it is basically non-existent. The two examples shown in the video for example: The Witcher 2 actually shows nipples. While Senran Kagura even though you see a woman with no clothing you don't actually see the "private" parts.

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  • April 13, 2017 at 6:02 am
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    The ratings system affects sales.
    Publishers and developers have to abide by the ESRB, and therefore must alter and censor their artistic expressions so that they are able to gain profit from their work… Imagine telling artists of any other medium they aren't allowed to paint, draw, or write what they actually want to because it will get their work blacklisted and therefore make it unprofitable. I'm aware that still happens, but not at all to the extent that it does in the games industry.

    The fact that this is just the way things are and always will be is very disheartening.
    Artistic expression should be free of these things.

    The ESRB was originally supposed to be a general guide for parents, but the system has become something that limits freedom of expression in art.

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  • April 14, 2017 at 6:23 pm
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    REMEMBER: The ESRB isn't evil, but they do have a bias. We all have biases. All we can do is hope publishers see more and more how censorship can hurt sales.

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  • April 15, 2017 at 7:00 am
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    13-17 isn't that big of a range. What really needs to happen is a rating between M and AO, so that they can't use "It might get an AO rating" as an excuse to censor things that don't need to be censored. A panty shot is not going to destroy anyone's life.

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  • April 17, 2017 at 8:51 pm
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    what about pegi

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  • April 28, 2017 at 9:25 pm
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    I know I'm two months late, but I feel like pointing out the European PEGI rating system:
    http://www.pegi.info/en/index/id/33/
    Ratings are 3, 7, 12, 16 and 18. With 18 not treated as the same as an AO rating in the ESRB, I.e. Games rated 18 include Mortal Kombat, which ARE sold on consoles. As far as I'm aware, PEGI does not rate games with outright porn or violence-porn in them, thus preventing them from being sold over-the-counter in Europe.

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  • June 17, 2017 at 4:29 pm
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    "Rating categories are meant to provide a general guidance …. for parents" Except as noted later on, retailers use these to determine what they sell. The problem, IMO, is that has become the main use of these ratings, retailers use them to decide what games they would like to sell in their stores. Parents rarely use them for anything.

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  • July 4, 2017 at 12:16 am
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    They never answered why we need both 17+ and 18+ ratings. Probably because there is no valid reason.

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  • July 19, 2017 at 1:06 pm
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    # Abolish Censorship

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  • July 25, 2017 at 9:43 am
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    What game is at 0:22?

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  • August 10, 2017 at 10:56 am
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    i reached out to the ESRB once. it looked like they put a descriptor onto a rating that didn't belong. they said i was wrong, they didn't even hint at why i was wrong. if you politely say that someone might have made a mistake and the answer is essentially a polite shut up then you know that they know they are in the wrong. i no longer consider the ESRB to be a valid rating system.

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  • August 14, 2017 at 3:48 pm
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    I remember when blockbuster sold ao games

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  • August 17, 2017 at 2:46 am
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    Its time we as young adult gamers have the right to have any game made the way we as consumers want we pay hundreds if not thousands of dollars to play what we want on our consoles WE need to make game designer/creator tools available for the public so we no longer have to abide by what big brother tells us whats appropriate for us to play its censorship plus I wana make a system just for adults so theres no more playing with kid's that be awesome right? and a violation of our rights! Lmk wyt? And any tips on how We can get this movement public and how I can get started an where I should start thank you for your opinions im sick of being told I cant play a game because Timmys Mom says its innaprobiate for her son who cares if the game we want doesn't coincide with her childrens age im 22 not 10 yrs old WTF why do there opinions over rule ours we pay thousands of dollars to play games and have to be told that its ok as long as her kids get to play too WTF thats ridiculous!

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  • December 5, 2017 at 3:07 am
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    2:10 that octopus looks piss, as if it was forced into a situation it doesnt want to be a part of

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  • April 25, 2018 at 5:29 pm
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    Who decided that AO rated titles don't get released on consoles?

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  • April 29, 2018 at 7:11 pm
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    How about m rated games have no censorship as a happy middle ground for getting on the so called black list I'd be getting those oh and if it had hot anime chicks naked I wouldn't care I like hot girls. And sex sure if that wasn't proper the human race would be extinct. The censorship of games needs to stop. They need to know it's only hurting sales. Also sjw snowflakes don't play the game they whin and complain about the game companies and censor companies and the places that sell the games need to stop pandering to the sjw snowflakes if they are worried about it just add a sjw switch option for those who don't like games. I'm beyond angered at the censorship of the games I play and the mods I'm able to use because those who control the type of mods available are pandering to those who don't even play I am enraged!!!!

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  • May 15, 2018 at 4:04 am
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    I'm still wondering how fallout is rated mature

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